It’s never to early (or late) to learn to code

From December 8-14, all over the world youth will be doing something incredible for one hour (and maybe even more.)

They are going to code. Yes, code. They are going to dabble in the waters of programming through an effort called Hour of Code, which is a one-hour introduction to Computer Science, held during Computer Science Week. Organized by Code.org, a public 501c3 not profit dedicated to expanding participation in Computer Science by making it available in more schools. People can sign up to host an event, provide a tutorial, and more. The events themselves take place around the globe for one hour.

Of course, you don’t have to be a kid, tween, or teen to learn to code. You just have to have the desire to learn something new.

Learning how to code and do programming (development) work can benefit people of any age or skill level.

Job changers, new to the workforce, or simply those who want to add to their knowledge base can find numerous free and nearly free online resources and programs that can help you learn and eventually, earn from your newly acquired talents.

A few notable programs to check out:

We would argue that you can be any age and learn to code, and can put it to use if you so desired. Coding and doing development work relies on talent who keep their skills sharp and aren’t afraid to learn something new. Many positions only require having the drive and skills necessary to do the work, and not a degree (although in some circumstances, it’s required.) Opportunity is abound in the tech sector, and thanks to public programs such as Hour of Code, Code.org, Code Academy, Code School and Learn Code the Hard Way, (just to name a few) any one can be a part of it.