Is it time to pull staffing partner/recruiter ‘weeds?’

If you’re in HR, procurement, or are a hiring authority in a company, chances are you get inundated with solicitations from staffing partners and recruiters several times a week, if not daily. It can be tough to figure out which firms or individuals are good, and those to avoid.Time to pull the recruiter and staffing partner 'weeds'

Before we get to the business of pulling those weeds, let’s check on the overall health of your talent acquisition process. Signs of a potentially unhealthy recruitment relationship that can lead to stalled growth and harbor weeds, stem from “churn and burn” practices.

Often, staffing partners/recruiters already have an established relationship with lackluster managers where getting positions filled to make performance targets is their only priority. They seldom ask ‘why’ they are hiring this talent, and if results are being produced to justify the cost for doing so. Such relationships can be detrimental for the talent pipeline and the overall health of your organization.

If you’ve identified such practices in your company, it may be time to review why this system is being favored and the results thereof currently and historically with any departments or managers that use this method. What do retention rates look like for employees? Is the manager growing their team for the sake of growing, or are they developing current employees into future leaders? Have the candidates supplied been great additions, or has there been lots of turnover?

Now that you’ve identified and hopefully addressed any potential future weed growth, it’s time to pull the staffing partner/recruiter weeds that are there now.

WEED STAFFING PARTNER/RECRUITER IDENTIFICATION

COMMON WEEDS: 

  • Spend more time talking and selling, instead of listening
  • Do not take time to learn what is unique and interesting about the company and culture
  • Start selling the position to a candidate without doing their homework to see if it would be a good fit for both parties
  • Pressure hiring managers into accepting their talent submissions
  • Do not really ‘know’ their candidate – i.e. communication style, cultural fit
  • If known, will tell the candidates what questions they will likely get asked during the interview and coach them to the point of ‘rehearsed responses’ (not allowing for a fair assessment)
  • Deflect questions from the candidate
  • Do not or will not address any objections the candidate may have (also may come up during the interview process)
  • Lack the skills to work with managers to address objections they are getting from candidates and not just sell the position around them
  • Assume little to no ownership of bad placements and not note what will be needed for the replacement to be a success 

REMEMBER!

GOOD STAFFING PARTNERS/RECRUITERS WANT TO HELP THEIR CLIENTS GROW AND PRODUCE HEALTHY TALENT BEDS. BAD ONES WANT TO SELL WEED CONTROL SERVICES